USS Sproston (DD-173/ DM-13)

USS Sproston (DD-173/ DM-13)


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USS Sproston (DD-173/ DM-13)

USS Sproston (DD-173/ DM-13) was a Wickes class destroyer that served as a light minelayer at Hawaii from 1920-22 before being decommissioned.

The Sproston was named after John G. Sproston, a US naval officer during the Mexican War and the American Civil War, who was killed during an attack in the St. John's River, Florida, on 8 June 1862

The Sproston was laid down by the Union Iron Works, San Francisco, on 20 April 1918, launched on 10 August 1918 and commissioned on 12 July 1919. She was allocated to the Pacific Fleet and was based at Hawaii from the autumn of 1919 onwards.

On 17 July 1920 the Sproston was one of a number of destroyers to be reclassified as light minelayers, as DM-13. She continued to operate around Hawaii, but in 1922 she was chosen to be one of the destroyers removed from service under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty. She was decommissioned on 15 August 1922 and spent the next fourteen years in the reserve fleet. In 1936 she was chosen for use as a gunnery target, and on 1 December 1936 she was struck off the navy list and sunk by US gunfire.

Displacement (standard)

Displacement (loaded)

Top Speed

35kts design
34.81kts at 27,350shp at 1,236t on trial (Kimberly)

Engine

2 shaft Parsons turbines
4 boilers
27,000shp design

Range

2,500nm at 20kts (design)

Armour - belt

- deck

Length

314ft 4.5in

Width

30ft 11.5in

Armaments

Four 4in/ 50 guns
Twelve 21in torpedo tubes in four triple mountings
Two 1-pounder AA guns
Two depth charge tracks

Crew complement

100

Laid down

20 April 1918

Launched

10 August 1918

Commissioned

12 July 1919

Decommissioned

15 August 1922

Struck off

1 December 1936


Richard W. Bates papers

Rear Admiral Richard W. Bates was born in San Francisco, California, on January 16, 1892, to Henry Lester and Helen Rixon Bates. He was appointed to the United States Naval Academy from the Third District, California, in 1911 and graduated in the Class of 1915. His first duty assignment was on board the USS YORKTOWN (GBT-1) stationed in Central American waters. From YORKTOWN he went to the USS CINCINNATI (C-7), operating on the east coast of South America, where he served as Executive Officer until 1918. He was Executive Officer in the USS SPROSTON (DD-173), 1919-1920.

In 1920 Bates attended the Naval Post Graduate School in Annapolis, Maryland. The following year found him at Columbia University, studying electrical propulsion of ships. Awarded a Master of Science degree in June 1922, he continued instruction in electrical engineering at General Electric, Schenectady, New York, and Westinghouse Electric, East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This was followed by duty as the Electrical Officer in the USS MARYLAND (BB-46), 1922-1925 assistant in engineering at the Post Graduate School, 1925-1927, and Engineering Officer in the USS RICHMOND (CL-9), 1927-1930.

In the decade before Americaa's entry into the Second World War, Rear Admiral Bates saw duty with the Hydrographic Office, Honolulu and as Commander of the Naval Station, Honolulu Commanding Officer of the destroyer, USS BUCHANAN (DD-131), the oil tanker, RAMAPO (AO-12), the destroyers USS LONG (DD-209), and USS CLARK (DD-361), flagship of Destroyer Squadron Three, Battle Force.

When the war broke out, Bates was a student at the Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island. He continued at the College as a member of the staff until 1943 when he took command of the cruiser USS MINNEAPOLIS (CA-36). Under his command the ship engaged in the bombardment of Wake Island, participated in the invasion of the Gilbert Islands and sank the Japanese light cruiser KATORI off Truk in April 1944.

During May-August 1944, Bates was on the staff of the Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet. In September he served with the Commander Cruiser Division Four as Chief of Staff of the Bombardment, Fire Support and associated groups of the Seventh Fleet during the Philippine Islands campaign. December found him Chief of Staff and Aide to Commander Battleship Division Two and involved in the Lingayen-Luzon and Okinawa operations. This was followed in May 1945 by his appointment as Commander of the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron, Pacific Fleet and in December of the same year with appointment as Chief of Staff to Commander, Philippine Sea Frontier.

Bates returned to the Naval War College in 1946 as Head of the Department of Research and Analysis which was tasked with studying Second World War naval battles. Retired in 1949, he remained with the College, continuing his battle analyses in charge of what now had become the World War II Battle Evaluation Group. Although the work was not completed, the project was terminated in 1958.

In 1969 Bates was appointed Vice President of the newly formed Naval War College Foundation, Inc., a private, non-profit association founded to support College programs not covered by appropriated funding. He was elected president in 1972, serving in that capacity until his death on December 27, 1973.




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Apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples

The Speaker of the House (Hon Harry Jenkins MP): The Clerk.

The Clerk: Government business notice number 1, Motion offering an apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples.

The Speaker: Prime Minister.

Prime Minister (Hon Kevin Rudd MP): Mr Speaker, I move:

That today we honour the Indigenous peoples of this land, the oldest continuing cultures in human history.

We reflect on their past mistreatment.

We reflect in particular on the mistreatment of those who were Stolen Generations - this blemished chapter in our nation's history.

The time has now come for the nation to turn a new page in Australia's history by righting the wrongs of the past and so moving forward with confidence to the future.

We apologise for the laws and policies of successive Parliaments and governments that have inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss on these our fellow Australians.

We apologise especially for the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, their communities and their country.

For the pain, suffering and hurt of these Stolen Generations, their descendants and for their families left behind, we say sorry.

To the mothers and the fathers, the brothers and the sisters, for the breaking up of families and communities, we say sorry.

And for the indignity and degradation thus inflicted on a proud people and a proud culture, we say sorry.

We the Parliament of Australia respectfully request that this apology be received in the spirit in which it is offered as part of the healing of the nation.

For the future we take heart resolving that this new page in the history of our great continent can now be written.

We today take this first step by acknowledging the past and laying claim to a future that embraces all Australians.

A future where this Parliament resolves that the injustices of the past must never, never happen again.

A future where we harness the determination of all Australians, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to close the gap that lies between us in life expectancy, educational achievement and economic opportunity.

A future where we embrace the possibility of new solutions to enduring problems where old approaches have failed.

A future based on mutual respect, mutual resolve and mutual responsibility.

A future where all Australians, whatever their origins, are truly equal partners, with equal opportunities and with an equal stake in shaping the next chapter in the history of this great country, Australia.


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USS Sproston (DD-173/ DM-13) - History

Naval Historical Collection, U.S. Naval War College

Finding aid encoded by Carrie Anne Perez 2011 March 22 , updated by Le Yang on 2011 July 26. English Finding aid based on Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS)

Richard W. Bates papers 1915-1973 Bates (Richard W.) papers

Rear Admiral Richard W. Bates was born in San Francisco, California, on January 16, 1892, to Henry Lester and Helen Rixon Bates. He was appointed to the United States Naval Academy from the Third District, California, in 1911 and graduated in the Class of 1915. His first duty assignment was on board the USS YORKTOWN (GBT-1) stationed in Central American waters. From YORKTOWN he went to the USS CINCINNATI (C-7), operating on the east coast of South America, where he served as Executive Officer until 1918. He was Executive Officer in the USS SPROSTON (DD-173), 1919-1920.

In 1920 Bates attended the Naval Post Graduate School in Annapolis, Maryland. The following year found him at Columbia University, studying electrical propulsion of ships. Awarded a Master of Science degree in June 1922, he continued instruction in electrical engineering at General Electric, Schenectady, New York, and Westinghouse Electric, East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This was followed by duty as the Electrical Officer in the USS MARYLAND (BB-46), 1922-1925 assistant in engineering at the Post Graduate School, 1925-1927, and Engineering Officer in the USS RICHMOND (CL-9), 1927-1930.

In the decade before Americaa's entry into the Second World War, Rear Admiral Bates saw duty with the Hydrographic Office, Honolulu and as Commander of the Naval Station, Honolulu Commanding Officer of the destroyer, USS BUCHANAN (DD-131), the oil tanker, RAMAPO (AO-12), the destroyers USS LONG (DD-209), and USS CLARK (DD-361), flagship of Destroyer Squadron Three, Battle Force.

When the war broke out, Bates was a student at the Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island. He continued at the College as a member of the staff until 1943 when he took command of the cruiser USS MINNEAPOLIS (CA-36). Under his command the ship engaged in the bombardment of Wake Island, participated in the invasion of the Gilbert Islands and sank the Japanese light cruiser KATORI off Truk in April 1944.

During May-August 1944, Bates was on the staff of the Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet. In September he served with the Commander Cruiser Division Four as Chief of Staff of the Bombardment, Fire Support and associated groups of the Seventh Fleet during the Philippine Islands campaign. December found him Chief of Staff and Aide to Commander Battleship Division Two and involved in the Lingayen-Luzon and Okinawa operations. This was followed in May 1945 by his appointment as Commander of the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron, Pacific Fleet and in December of the same year with appointment as Chief of Staff to Commander, Philippine Sea Frontier.

Bates returned to the Naval War College in 1946 as Head of the Department of Research and Analysis which was tasked with studying Second World War naval battles. Retired in 1949, he remained with the College, continuing his battle analyses in charge of what now had become the World War II Battle Evaluation Group. Although the work was not completed, the project was terminated in 1958.

In 1969 Bates was appointed Vice President of the newly formed Naval War College Foundation, Inc., a private, non-profit association founded to support College programs not covered by appropriated funding. He was elected president in 1972, serving in that capacity until his death on December 27, 1973.

Access is open to all researchers, unless otherwise specified.

Material in this collection is in the public domain, unless otherwise noted.

Author, “Title,” Page or Date. Richard W. Bates papers, MSC-028, Box number, Folder number. Naval Historical Collection, U.S. Naval War College, Newport, R.I.

This collection documents the many correspondences throughout Rear Admiral Richard W. Bates Naval career. In addition, some of the materials deal with naval business while others relate to his personal matters. The papers are arranged in four series based on an established file system. In addition to the correspondence, the collection also contains Subject Files regarding such things as Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons, Pacific Fleet, and Navy official communications Speeches and Writings that span 1942-1967 and Miscellany, 1915-1973 which consists of newspaper clippings, citations, invitations and member scrolls.

The collection is arranged into four series, with Series 1, Correspondence, being the most voluminous.

The personal papers of Rear Admiral Richard W. Bates were acquired in 1974 through the Naval War College Foundation by the term of Bates' will.

Subjects United States Naval Academy Naval War College (U.S.)--Presidents Naval War College (U.S.)--History Naval War College (U.S.). Foundation World War, 1939-1945--Campaigns--Pacific Ocean Naval education--United States Torpedo-boats Series I Correspondence 1938-1973

Series I, Correspondence, is divided into "personal" and "informal" letters, although there appears to be little difference between the two content wise. Bates maintained a voluminous correspondence with naval officers and civilians. Letters deal chiefly with career matters, family matters, and social life in Newport. Correspondents include Admirals Ernest J. King, Chester W. Nimitz, Raymond A. Spruance, William F. Halsey, Richmond K. Turner, Robert B. Carney, Edward Kalbfus, William S. Pye, and Richard L. Conolly. Also included are copies of letters of other naval officers, namely, Admirals King, Kinkaid, and Captain S. E. Morison, 1944-1953.

1 1 undated Personal letters, sent 1 2 1938 Jul 30 - 1939 Mar 28 Personal letters, sent 1 3 1939 Apr 11 - 1939 Jun 28 Personal letters, sent 1 4 1939 Jul 5 - 1939 Oct 30 Personal letters, sent 1 5 1939 Oct 31 - 1940 Jan 20 Personal letters, sent 1 6 1940 Jan 23 - 1940 Apr 14 Personal letters, sent 1 7 1940 May 9 - 1940 Jun 13 Personal letters, sent 1 8 1941 May 22 - 1941 Dec 30 Personal letters, sent 1 9 1942 Jan 5 - 1942 May 14 Personal letters, sent 1 10 1942 May 27 - 1942 Sep 18 Personal letters, sent 1 11 1942 Sep 14 - 1942 Dec 14 Personal letters, sent 1 12 1943 Jan 14 - 1943 Mar 12 Personal letters, sent 1 13 1943 Mar 16 - 1943 Jul 1 Personal letters, sent 1 14 1943 Jul 21 - 1943 Oct 24 Personal letters, sent 1 15 1943 Oct 30 - 1943 Dec 23 Personal letters, sent 1 16 1944 Jan 15 - 1944 Apr 12 Personal letters, sent 1 17 1944 Apr 16 - 1944 Jun 13 Personal letters, sent 1 18 1944 Jun 18 - 1944 Aug 15 Personal letters, sent 1 19 1944 Oct 11 - 1945 Apr 26 Personal letters, sent 1 20 1945 Apr 26 - 1945 May 19 Personal letters, sent 1 21 1945 Jun 4 - 1945 Jun 29 Personal letters, sent 1 22 1945 Jun 29 - 1945 Jul 24 Personal letters, sent 1 23 1945 Jul 26 - 1945 Aug 2 Personal letters, sent 1 24 1945 Aug 2 - 1945 Aug 15 Personal letters, sent 1 25 1945 Aug 15 - 1945 Aug 30 Personal letters, sent 1 26 1945 Aug 30 - 1945 Sep 14 Personal letters, sent 1 27 1945 Sep 15 - 1945 Sep 28 Personal letters, sent 1 28 1945 Oct 1 - 1945 Nov 10 Personal letters, sent 1 29 1945 Nov 13 - 1945 Nov 26 Personal letters, sent 1 30 1945 Nov 27 - 1945 Dec 7 Personal letters, sent 1 31 1945 Dec 10 - 1945 Dec 26 Personal letters, sent 1 32 1945 Dec 26 - 1945 Dec 28 Personal letters, sent 1 33 1946 Jan 2 - 1946 Apr 24 Personal letters, sent 1 34 1946 May 1 - 1946 Jun 1 Personal letters, sent 1 35 1946 Jun 4 - 1946 Jul 24 Personal letters, sent 1 36 1946 Sep 17 - 1946 Dec 10 Personal letters, sent 1 37 1946 Dec 20 - 1947 Mar 19 Personal letters, sent 1 38 1947 Mar 26 - 1947 Dec 15 Personal letters, sent 2 1 1948 Jan 7 - 1948 Mar 17 Personal Letters sent 2 2 1948 Mar 17 - 1948 May 16 Personal Letters sent 2 3 1948 May 25 - 1948 Jun 25 Personal Letters sent 2 4 1948 Jun 25 - 1948 Aug 19 Personal Letters sent 2 5 1948 Aug 19 - 1948 Sep 13 Personal Letters sent 2 6 1948 Sep 15 - 1948 Oct 25 Personal Letters sent 2 7 1948 Oct 25 - 1948 Dec 16 Personal Letters sent 2 8 1950 Jan 26 - 1950 Dec 12 Personal Letters sent 2 9 1950 Dec 14 - 1951 Mar 26 Personal Letters sent 2 10 1951 Apr 5 - 1951 Aug 3 Personal Letters sent 2 11 1951 Aug 8 - 1951 Dec 20 Personal Letters sent 2 12 1952 Jan 8 - 1952 Dec 18 Personal Letters sent 2 13 1953 Jan 16 - 1953 Dec 28 Personal Letters sent 2 14 1954 Jan 5 - 1954 Feb 15 Personal Letters sent 2 15 1954 Feb 26 - 1954 May 11 Personal Letters sent 2 16 1954 May 12 - 1954 Sep 22 Personal Letters sent 2 17 1954 Sep 25 - 1954 Dec 17 Personal Letters sent 2 18 1955 Jan 3 - 1955 May 13 Personal Letters sent 2 19 1955 Jun 14 - 1955 Oct 12 Personal Letters sent 2 20 1955 Oct 12 - 1955 Dec 30 Personal Letters sent 2 21 1956 Feb 16 - 1956 Jun 19 Personal Letters sent 2 22 1956 Jun 19 - 1956 Sep 11 Personal Letters sent 2 23 1956 Sep 13 - 1956 Oct 23 Personal Letters sent 2 24 1956 Nov 13 - 1956 Dec 18 Personal Letters sent 2 25 1957 Jan 4 - 1957 Apr 11 Personal Letters sent 2 26 1957 Apr 17 - 1957 May 24 Personal Letters sent 2 27 1957 Jun 11 - 1957 Sep 24 Personal Letters sent 3 1 1957 Oct 1 - 1957 Nov 16 Personal letters sent 3 2 1957 Nov 16 - 1957 Dec 19 Personal letters sent 3 3 1958 Jan 7 - 1958 Feb 28 Personal letters sent 3 4 1958 Mar 5 - 1958 Apr 22 Personal letters sent 3 5 1958 Apr 22 - 1958 May 14 Personal letters sent 3 6 1958 May 14 - 1958 May 27 Personal letters sent 3 7 1958 May 27 - 1958 Jun 2 Personal letters sent 3 8 1958 Jun 2 - 1958 Aug 21 Personal letters sent 3 9 1958 Aug 21 - 1958 Nov 17 Personal letters sent 3 10 1958 Nov 19 - 1958 Dec 31 Personal letters sent 3 11 1959 Jan 9 - 1959 Apr 2 Personal letters sent 3 12 1959 Apr 14 - 1959 Jun 16 Personal letters sent 3 13 1959 Jun 16 - 1959 Jul 24 Personal letters sent 3 14 1959 Aug 19 - 1959 Nov 9 Personal letters sent 3 15 1959 Nov 10 - 1959 Dec 12 Personal letters sent 3 16 1960 Jan 6 - 1960 May 6 Personal letters sent 3 17 1960 May 19 - 1960 Sep 29 Personal letters sent 3 18 1960 Oct 3 - 1960 Nov 30 Personal letters sent 3 19 1960 Nov 30 - 1960 Dec 28 Personal letters sent 3 20 1961 Jan 6 - 1961 Mar 30 Personal letters sent 3 21 1961 Mar 21 - 1961 Jul 10 Personal letters sent 3 22 1962 Jan 15 - 1963 Dec 2 Personal letters sent 3 23 1964 Dec 29 - 1969 Mar 17 Personal letters sent 3 24 1969 May 19 - 1970 Oct 19 Personal letters sent 3 25 1964 Jun 8 - 1969 Dec 12 Personal letters sent 3 26 1949 Jan 3 - 1949 Feb 16 Informal letters sent 3 27 1949 Feb 23 - 1959 Jun 15 Informal letters sent 3 28 1949 Jul 12 - 1950 Jun 13 Informal letters sent 3 29 1950 Jun 27 - 1950 Oct 4 Informal letters sent 4 1 1950 Oct 9 - 1950 Dec 18 Informal letters sent 4 2 1951 Jan 3 - 1951 Feb 8 Informal letters sent 4 3 1951 Feb 12 - 1951 May 10 Informal letters sent 4 4 1951 May 11 - 1951 Aug 3 Informal letters sent 4 5 1951 Aug 7 - 1951 Dec 19 Informal letters sent 4 6 1951 Jan 9 - 1952 Mar 17 Informal letters sent 4 7 1952 Mar 18 - 1952 May 9 Informal letters sent 4 8 1952 May 13 - 1952 Jul 31 Informal letters sent 4 9 1952 Aug 14 - 1952 Nov 14 Informal letters sent 4 10 1953 Jan 16 - 1953 Mar 11 Informal letters sent 4 11 1953 Mar 27 - 1953 Aug 28 Informal letters sent 4 12 1953 Sep 1 - 1953 Dec 30 Informal letters sent 4 13 1954 Jan 15 - 1954 Aug 25 Informal letters sent 4 14 1954 Sep 2 - 1954 Dec 17 Informal letters sent 4 15 1955 Jan 3 - 1955 Feb 25 Informal letters sent 4 16 1955 Mar 9 - 1955 Sep 28 Informal letters sent 4 17 1955 Sep 28 - 1955 Nov 28 Informal letters sent 4 18 1955 Nov 28 - 1955 Dec 16 Informal letters sent 4 19 1954 Jan 3 - 1954 Feb 16 Informal letters sent 4 20 1956 Feb 8 - 1956 Nov 30 Informal letters sent 4 21 1957 Jan 2 - 1957 May 6 Informal letters sent 4 22 1957 May 6 - 1957 May 28 Informal letters sent 4 23 1957 Jun 5 - 1957 Jul 26 Informal letters sent 4 24 1957 Aug 29 - 1957 Dec 19 Informal letters sent 4 25 1965 Feb 18 - 1971 Nov 17 Informal letters sent 4 26 1972 Jun 12 - 1972 Dec 29 Informal letters sent 4 27 1973 Jan 2 - 1973 Oct 25 Informal letters sent 5 1 undated Personal letters received, undated 5 2 undated Personal letters received, undated 5 3 1932 Apr 18 - 1938 Oct 21 Personal letters received, undated 5 4 1939 Jan 16 - 1939 Dec 22 Personal letters received, undated 5 5 1940 Jan 19 - 1940 May 27 Personal letters received, undated 5 6 1941 May 24 - 1941 Dec 22 Personal letters received, undated 5 7 1942 Jan 2 - 1942 Aug 25 Personal letters received, undated 5 8 1942 Aug 29 - 1942 Dec 31 Personal letters received, undated 5 9 1943 Jan 19 - 1943 May 22 Personal letters received, undated 5 10 1943 Jun 2 - 1943 Dec 3 Personal letters received, undated 5 11 1944 Jan 3 - 1944 May 27 Personal letters received, undated 5 12 1944 May 27 - 1944 Dec 31 Personal letters received, undated 5 13 1945 Apr 10 - 1945 Jun 22 Personal letters received, undated 5 14 1945 Aug 8 - 1945 0ct 26 Personal letters received, undated 5 15 1945 Oct 26 - 1945 Dec 27 Personal letters received, undated 5 16 1946 Jan 2 - 1946 Feb 5 Personal letters received, undated 5 17 1946 Feb 7 - 1946 Aug 5 Personal letters received, undated 6 1 1946 Sep 19 - 1946 Dec 26 Personal letters received 6 2 1947 Jan 8 - 1947 Dec 4 Personal letters received 6 3 1948 Jan 12 - 1950 May 9 Personal letters received 6 4 1951 Jan 26 - 1951 Apr 18 Personal letters received 6 5 1951 Apr 18 - 1951 Jul 26 Personal letters received 6 6 1951 Jul 31 - 1951 Aug 30 Personal letters received 6 7 1951 Sep 2 - 1951 Dec 11 Personal letters received 6 8 1952 Jan 10 - 1952 Apr 25 Personal letters received 6 9 1952 May 22 - 1952 Dec 31 Personal letters received 6 10 1953 Jan 7 - 1953 Mar 7 Personal letters received 6 11 1953 Mar 11 - 1953 Aug 4 Personal letters received 6 12 1953 Aug 13 - 1953 Nov 28 Personal letters received 6 13 1954 Jan 6 - 1954 Jul 2 Personal letters received 6 14 1954 Jul 6 - 1954 Sep 22 Personal letters received 6 15 1954 Sep 23 - 1954 Oct 4 Personal letters received 6 16 1954 Oct 11 - 1954 Dec 19 Personal letters received 6 17 1955 Jan 7 - 1955 Mar 15 Personal letters received 6 18 1955 Mar 15 - 1955 Oct 17 Personal letters received 6 19 1955 Oct 18 - 1955 Dec 23 Personal letters received 6 20 1956 Jan 19 - 1956 May 19 Personal letters received 6 21 1956 May 23 - 1956 Aug 8 Personal letters received 6 22 1956 Aug 8 - 1956 Sep 24 Personal letters received 6 23 1956 Oct 2 - 1956 Dec 17 Personal letters received 6 24 1957 Jan 5 - 1957 May 23 Personal letters received 6 25 1957 May 23 - 1957 Sep 9 Personal letters received 6 26 1957 Sep 16 - 1957 Oct 14 Personal letters received 6 27 1957 Oct 22 - 1957 Dec 4 Personal letters received 7 1 1957 Dec 23 - 1958 Feb 18 Personal letters received 7 2 1958 Feb 9 - 1958 Apr 22 Personal letters received 7 3 1958 Apr 24 - 1958 Jun 5 Personal letters received 7 4 1958 Jun 10 - 1958 Jul 18 Personal letters received 7 5 1958 Aug 27 - 1958 Nov 1 Personal letters received 7 6 1959 Jan 6 - 1959 Jan 28 Personal letters received 7 7 1959 Feb 13 - 1959 Feb 19 Personal letters received 7 8 1959 Mar 17 - 1959 Jun 16 Personal letters received 7 9 1959 Jun 25 - 1959 Dec 31 Personal letters received 7 10 1960 Jan 7 - 1960 Feb 1 Personal letters received 7 11 1960 Feb 2 - 1960 Mar 14 Personal letters received 7 12 1960 Mar 14 - 1960 Jun 16 Personal letters received 7 13 1960 Jun 17 - 1960 Sep 16 Personal letters received 7 14 1960 Sep 21 - 1960 Dec 19 Personal letters received 7 15 1961 Jan 20 - 1961 Dec 16 Personal letters received 7 16 1962 Jan 1 - 1962 Jun 25 Personal letters received 7 17 1963 Feb 7 - 1963 Jun 15 Personal letters received 7 18 1963 Jul 10 - 1963 Oct 30 Personal letters received 7 19 1964 Jan 20 - 1964 Sep 25 Personal letters received 7 20 1965 Jan 12 - 1965 Nov 9 Personal letters received 7 21 1966 Mar 8 - 1967 Sep 7 Personal letters received 8 1 1946 Jun 19 - 1947 Dec 5 Personal letters received 8 2 1948 Jan 23 - 1949 Nov 15 Personal letters received 8 3 1950 Jan 4 - 1950 Jul 20 Personal letters received 8 4 1950 Jul 21 - 1950 Oct 31 Personal letters received 8 5 1950 Nov 2 - 1950 Dec 29 Personal letters received 8 6 1951 Jan 13 - 1951 Mar 29 Personal letters received 8 7 1951 Apr 7 - 1951 Oct 30 Personal letters received 8 8 1951 Nov 23 - 1952 Apr 28 Personal letters received 8 9 1952 May 6 - 1952 Dec 3 Personal letters received 8 10 1953 Jan 2 - 1953 Dec 28 Personal letters received 8 11 1954 Jan 14 - 1954 Jul 12 Personal letters received 8 12 1954 Aug 5 - 1954 Dec 22 Personal letters received 8 13 1955 Jan 5 - 1955 Feb 25 Personal letters received 8 14 1955 Mar 2 - 1955 Jul 29 Personal letters received 8 15 1955 Aug 11 - 1955 Dec 13 Personal letters received 8 16 1956 Jan 5 - 1956 Apr 12 Personal letters received 8 17 1956 Apr 25 - 1956 Jul 10 Personal letters received 8 18 1956 Jul 13 - 1956 Nov 7 Personal letters received 8 19 1957 Feb 1 - 1957 Jun 29 Personal letters received 8 20 1957 Jul 13 - 1957 Sep 15 Personal letters received 8 21 1957 Sep 23 - 1957 Dec 30 Personal letters received 8 22 1958 Jan 10 - 1958 Jun 28 Personal letters received 8 23 1958 Aug 1 - 1958 Oct 15 Personal letters received 8 24 1958 Oct 17 - 1958 Dec 16 Personal letters received 8 25 1961 Jan 13 - 1961 Feb 23 Personal letters received 8 26 1961 Mar 17 - 1962 Dec 19 Personal letters received 8 27 1963 Apr 12 - 1964 Jun 16 Personal letters received 9 1 undated Informal letters received, fragments and undated 9 2 1968 Apr 4 - 1968 Dec 30 Informal letters received, fragments and undated 9 3 1969 Jan 13 - 1969 Dec 4 Informal letters received, fragments and undated 9 4 1970 Feb 21 - 1970 Oct 24 Informal letters received, fragments and undated 9 5 1971 Jan 18 - 1972 Dec 15 Informal letters received, fragments and undated 9 6 1972 Jul 5 - 1972 Oct 26 Informal letters received, fragments and undated 9 7 1973 Jan 4 - 1973 Dec 7 Informal letters received, fragments and undated 9 8 1960-1961 Copies of correspondence to Captain H. F. Lloyd and CDR Howard Cole, regarding being passed over for promotion to captain. 9 9 undated Copies of correspondence of MajGen Fergusson and an article by RADM William S. Sims regarding football in the Navy. 9 10 1948 Copies of correspondence of Paul Palmer, Reader's Digest and B. Bogart Blakely, regarding article on the Navy. 9 11 1944 Oct 17-27, Dec 16 Copy of naval message to ADM E. J. King, December 16, 1944 copy of portion of RADM Oldendorf's Night Order Book, regarding Admiral W. F. Halsey's Leyte Task Force 34. 9 12 1949 Aug 3, 1949 Sep 8 Copies of correspondence between ADM E. J. King and ADM T. C. Kinkaid, regarding naval messages sent by ADM Kinkaid on October 25, 1944. 9 13 1950-1953 Copies of correspondence to ADM T. C. Kinkaid, ADM E. J. King and Capt. S. E. Morison, regarding battles of Leyte Gulf and Surigao Strait. 9 14 1958-1968 Letters regarding Bates project Series II Subject Files 1916-1973

Series II, Subject Files, relates mainly to the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons, Pacific Fleet, Navy official communications and memoranda, the Naval War College, the World War II Battle Evaluation Group, and the Naval War College Foundation. Included are letters, memoranda, telegrams, dispatches, lectures, studies, minutes of meetings, and lists.

Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons, Pacific Fleet, Staff Instructions, November 1945 10 1 Administrative History October 1942-August 14, 1945 10 2 Administrative History, Appendix October 12, 1943-July 28, 1945 10 3 Decommissioning Dispatches September 2, 1945-September 7, 1946 10 4 Decommissioning Data September 1945-March, 1946 10 5 Correspondence and memoranda May 19, 1945-December 22, 1945 10 6 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda March 16-December 1943 11 1 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda January 1944-August 1945 11 2 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda August 1945-September 1945 11 3 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda October 1945-December 1945 11 4 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda December 1945 11 5 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda March 1946-March 1949 11 6 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda April 1949-May 1949 11 7 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda May 1949-May 1957 11 8 Navy Official Communications and Memoranda July 1957-February 1970 11 9 Medical History November 1948-August 1960 11 10 Temporary Duty June 1943-February 1945 11 11 Temporary Additional Duty October 1946-October 1955 11 12 Temporary Additional Duty 1950-1951 11 13 Temporary Additional Duty 1952 11 14 Temporary Additional Duty 1953 11 15 Temporary Additional Duty 1954 11 16 Temporary Additional Duty 1955 11 17 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda March 1943-December 1947 12 1 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda December 1947-January 1952 12 2 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda February 1952-July 1952 12 3 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda September 1952-May 1954 12 4 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda January 1955-November 1955 12 5 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda January 1956-June 1956 12 6 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda June 1956-December 1956 12 7 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda January 1957-August 1957 12 8 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda October 1957-May 1958 12 9 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda June 1959-April 1962 12 10 Naval War College Correspondence and memoranda July 1962-December 1970 12 11 Addresses and lectures, 1946-1957 12 12 World War II, Battle Evaluation Group, Correspondence fragments, undated 13 1 Correspondence August 1942-December 1949 13 2 Correspondence January 1951-December 1951 13 3 Correspondence January 1952-July 1954 13 4 Correspondence November 1954-December 1955 13 5 Correspondence February 1956-November 1956 13 6 Correspondence January 1957-June 1957 13 7 Correspondence June 1957-December 1957 13 8 Correspondence January 1958-July 1958 13 9 Correspondence August 1959-September 1959 13 10 Correspondence October 1960-May 1964 13 11 Correspondence May 1964-July 1964 13 12 Correspondence with Mrs. Lily Tanaka regarding translation work for Battle of Leyte Gulf 1953 13 13 Correspondence, Battle of Leyte Gulf 1954 13 14 Correspondence, Battle of Leyte Gulf 1955 13 15 Correspondence with Mrs. Lily Tanaka regarding translation work for Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1956-1958 14 1 Correspondence, 1956-1957 14 2 Correspondence, Letters sent to C. H. Kawakami regarding translation work, Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1950 14 3 Correspondence, Letters sent 1951 14 4 Correspondence, Letters sent 1952 14 5 Correspondence, Letters sent 1952 14 6 Correspondence, Letters sent 1953 14 7 Correspondence, Letters received from C. H. Kawakami regarding translation work, Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1950 14 8 Correspondence, Letters received, 1951 14 9 Correspondence, Letters received, 1951 14 10 Correspondence, Letters received, 1952 14 11 Correspondence, Letters received, 1952 14 12 Correspondence, Letters received, 1952 14 13 Correspondence, Letters received, 1953 14 14 Correspondence of ADM E. J. King and ADM T. Kinkaid regarding Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1944-1955 14 15 Correspondence with commentary of Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1952-1956 14 16 Correspondence with commentary on Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1954-1956 14 17 World War II Battle Evaluation Group, Correspondence regarding Battle of Surigao Strait, 1952-1957 15 1 Correspondence regarding Battle of Savo Island, 1950-1956 15 2 Correspondence regarding personnel request for BEG project, 1951-1956 15 3 Correspondence with Chief, Historical Division, Special Staff, US Army and Chief Historian, Liaison Office, regarding air searches conducted by Army Air Force, Leyte Operations, 1944. 1950-1951 15 4 Addresses and Outlines on strategical background prior to Battle of Leyte Gulf, tentative battle lessons, Leyte Gulf, 1944 15 5 Notes by ADM T. C. Kinkaid on Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1944 15 6 Review of S. E. Morison-s Leyte Gulf Operations by ADM Robert Carney, 1944 15 7 Script for movie of Battle of Savo Island, 1942 15 8 Script for movie of Battle of Savo Island by Toshikazu Ohmae edited by Roger Pineau 15 9 Detailed comments of senior member, Board of Review, Naval War College, Battle of Savo Island 15 10 Slide presentation, Battle of Surigao Strait, 1947 15 11 Battle of Surigao Strait by R. W. Bates, 1947, discussion with ADM Hill, Gen Gruenther, Gen Matheny, Capt Evenson and Col Howze. 1947 15 12 Commentary on torpedo run, Battle of Surigao Strait by LT Manning Smith 15 13 Photographic copy of Battle of Surigao Strait message 15 14 CDE H. E. Eccles account of Battle of the Java Sea, 1942 15 15 Reports of Japanese sub radar installations and cooperation of Japanese Army and Navy Air Force. 15 16 Naval War College Foundation, Inc., proposal for establishment of, 1969 16 1 Membership list and projects, 1969 16 2 Articles of Incorporation and bylaws, 1970 16 3 Trustees list, budget, annual meeting agenda and minutes, 1970 16 4 Memoranda, 1970-1972 16 5 Correspondence, 1969-1970 16 6 Correspondence, 1971-1972 16 7 Series III Speeches and Writings 1942-1967

Series III contains Admiral Bates' speeches and published and unpublished writings.

Speeches Undated 17 1 Speeches Undated 17 2 Speeches Undated 17 3 Speeches Undated 17 4 Speeches Undated 17 5 Speeches 1942 17 6 Speeches 1943-1944 17 7 Speeches 1942-1947 17 8 Speeches 1942-1967 17 9 Notes for Speeches Undated 17 10 Published writings on naval strategy 18 1 Unpublished writings on naval strategy 18 2 Unpublished writings on naval strategy 18 3 Published writings on tactics 18 4 Unpublished writings on the Naval Reserve, the naval blockade and history of USS Minneapolis (CA36) 18 5 Series IV Miscellany 1915-1973

Series IV consists of miscellaneous items including pamphlets, newspaper clippings, photographs, certificates and citations, invitations, programs, and calling cards.

Citations, programs, invitations, and membership scrolls 18 1 Press releases, newspaper clippings regarding Bates- career and family, undated 18 2 Newspaper Clippings, 1941-1948 18 3 Newspaper Clippings, 1952-1959 18 4 Newspaper Clippings, 1962-1964 18 5 Newspaper Clippings, 1968-1973 18 6 Newspaper Clippings, 1970-1972 18 7 The National Cyclopedia of American Biography, Bates entry, 1972-1973 18 8 Programs, bulletins 19 1 Programs, cards, notes, poems, and clippings 19 2 Notes 19 3 Commendations and Citations 19 4 Citations 19 5 Fitness reports and biographical information 19 6 USNA Class of 1915 Bulletins, 1954 19 7 USNA Class of 1915 Bulletins, 1955-1956 19 8 USNA Class of 1915 Bulletins, 1957 19 9 Newsletters 19 10 Pamphlets 19 11 Photographs, WWII career situations 19 12 Photographs, WWII career situation 19 13 Photographs, Arabian Nights Festival, Manila, Philippines, March 1946 19 14 Photographs, R. W. Bates at the Naval War College 20 1 Photographs, R. W. Bates at the Naval War College 20 2 Photographs, career and personal 20 3 Photographs, miscellaneous 20 4 Reminiscences of R. W. Bates by Thomas Synnott 20 5 Escort Carriers in Action 20 6


CTDOT Links & Resources

CTDOT Seeking Commuter Feedback and Opinions Concerning Return to Employer Worksites

Commissioner Giulietti Urges Connecticut Residents and Visitors to Help Prevent Crashes that Result in Deaths and Serious Injuries with ‘Toward Zero Deaths’ Campaign

CTDOT’s “Connecticut In Motion” Webinar Examines the Impact of COVID-19 on Current Workplace Trends and Commuting

Minor Train Schedule Changes for New Haven Line and Hartford Line Announced

CTDOT Announces Upcoming Infrastructure Improvements on the Waterbury Branch Substitute Busing Necessary


OpenQA

that can be found under http://openqa.opensuse.org/. More information can be found at http://open.qa/.

  • to determine if a build/release/set of updates is good, for both Leap and Tumbleweed releases,
  • to give users an idea about the current quality,
  • to find serious bugs as early as possible, and avoid releasing software that contains those.

The project currently can be found on Github/openSUSE/osem


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USS SPROSTON ( DD-173 )

John Glendy Sproston war der älteste Sohn von George Saxon Sproston, einem US Navy Arzt, und Jane Glendy, der Tochter des Reverend John Glendy der ein ehemaliger Kaplan des Senats der Vereinigten Staaten war. Der junge Sproston absolvierte im Jahre 1846 die United States Naval Academy. Anschließend versetzte man ihn zum Pazifik Geschwader das während des Mexikanisch-Amerikanischen Krieg an der kalifornischen Küste Mexikos operierte. Im Jahre 1854 war Sproston an der Expedition nach Japan beteiligt die von Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry ( 10. April 1794 – 4. März 1858 ) geleitet wurde. Nach dem Beginn des amerikanischen Bürgerkrieges kommandierte Sproston die Dampffregatte USS POWHATAN ( 1850 ) für kurze Zeit. Danach setzte man ihn als Exekutive Officer auf dem Kanoneboot USS SENECA ( 1861 ) ein. Während der Schlacht um Port Royal, South Carolina die vom 3. bis zum 7. November 1861 dauerte, richtete und feuerte Lieutenant Sproston persönlich viele der 11-Zoll Geschütze auf dem Kanonenboot ab. Die Geschützcrew auf dem Schiff war noch nicht vollständig im Gebrauch der Geschütze ausgebildet. Am 8. Juni 1862 kam Lieutenant Sproston bei der Verfolgung und Vernichtung eines konföderierten Piraten auf dem St. Johns River, Florida ums Leben. John Glendy Sproston begrub man neben seinem Vater auf dem Green Mount Friedhof in Baltimore, Maryland.

Zwei Schiffe sind zu Ehren von Lieutenant John Glendy Sproston bei der US Navy benannt worden.
Das erste Schiff war der Zerstörer USS SPROSTON ( DD-173 ) aus der WICKES – Klasse.
Das zweite Schiff war der Zerstörer USS SPROSTON ( DD-577 ) aus der FLETCHER – Klasse.

USS SPROSTON ( DD-173 )

Schiffsbiografie

Die USS SPROSTON ( DD-173 ) war das erste Schiff bei der US Navy, das zu Ehren von Lieutenant John Glendy Sproston benannt worden ist.
Der Zerstörer ist das neunundneunzigste Schiff aus der WICKES – Klasse.
Auf der Union Iron Works in San Francisco, Kalifornien wurde am 20. April 1918 der Kiel des Schiffes gelegt. Mrs. George J. Dennis taufte am 10. August 1918 den Zerstörer vor dessen Stapellauf. Lieutenant Commander Allan Gustavus Olson ( 8. Januar 1885 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois – 1. September 1976 in Chula Vista, San Diego County, Kalifornien ) stellte am 12. Juli 1919 das unter seinem Kommando stehende Schiff in den Dienst der US Navy.
Die USS SPROSTON verließ nach der Endausrüstung die kalifornische Küste und führte die Erprobungs- und Ausbildungsfahrt zu der amerikanischen Marinebasis auf Oahu, Pearl Harbor, Territorium Hawaii durch. Anschließend kehrte das Kriegsschiff an die US Westküste zurück und fuhr in seinen neuen Heimathafen San Diego, Kalifornien. Hier gliederte man im Herbst die USS SPROSTON in die Pazifikflotte ein.
Im Dezember lag der Zerstörer zusammen mit den Schwesterschiffen USS HOGAN ( DD-178 ), USS O´BANNON ( DD-177 ) und USS RENSHAW ( DD-176 ), die der Zerstörer Division 22 angehörten, sowie die aus der CLEMSON – Klasse stammende USS CHAUNCEY ( DD-296 ), welcher noch das einzige aktive Mitglied der Zerstörer Division 32 war. Doch schon im neuen Jahr 1920 standen der USS SPROSTON einige Veränderungen bevor. So rüstete man den Zerstörer zu einem Leichten Minenleger um und klassifizierte ihn am 17. Juli 1920 um. Das Kriegsschiff erhielt an diesem Tag die Kennung ( DM-13 ). Die USS SPROSTON wechselte nun vollends nach Pearl Harbor und beteiligte sich dort an den Ausbildungsübungen. Von der Marinebasis aus operierte der Leichte Minenleger bis 1922. Am 15. August 1922 stellte man das Kriegsschiff in Pearl Harbor außer Dienst und versetzte es in die Reserveflotte. Am 1. Dezember 1936 strich man den Namen USS SPROSTON ( DM-13 ) von der US Navy – Liste und versenkte den Schiffskörper am 20. Juli 1937 als Seeziel vor der kalifornischen Küste.

USS SPROSTON ( DD-173 )
Commanding Officer

LCDR Allan Gustavus Olson 11. Juli 1919 – 21. August 1919
CDR Daniel Aloysius McElduff 21. August 1919 – 30. Juli 1920
LCDR Charles Clifton Moses 30. Juli 1920 – 24. Juni 1921
LCDR Earl Harrison Quinlan 24. Juni 1921 – 14. Oktober 1921
CDR Reuben Lindsey Walker 14. Oktober 1921 – 5. August 1922


Watch the video: Minecraft Timelapse. USS Sproston DD-577 Fletcher Class. Designed by JagThunder1